follow ft86club on our blog, twitter or facebook. Interested in the FT-1? Check out FT1Club
FT86CLUB
Ft86Club
Delicious Tuning
Register Garage Members List Calendar Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read

Go Back   Scion FR-S Forum | Subaru BRZ Forum | Toyota 86 GT 86 Forum | AS1 Forum - FT86CLUB > Technical Topics > DIY (Do-It-Yourself) Guides

DIY (Do-It-Yourself) Guides For all DIYs.


User Tag List

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old 12-19-2012, 03:14 AM   #1
PMok
Codename: Stitch
 
PMok's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Drives: 05 tC; 06 IS350; 16 BRZ
Location: Hayward/NorCal
Posts: 5,091
Thanks: 3,724
Thanked 5,173 Times in 2,214 Posts
Mentioned: 440 Post(s)
Tagged: 6 Thread(s)
Arrow DIY - Changing Your Brake Pads (Race Pads upgrade)

In this writeup we are going to cover changing out your brake pads on a BRZ/FR-S. This guide will cover changing the front pads; I don't have photos covering the the rear set but the process is very similar and once you’ve done the front axle the rear axle will be pretty self-explanatory. While I had the wheels off I also flushed out the brake fluid and changed to Motul 660 Racing Brake Fluid, and installed speed bleeders, but I won’t get into that because @F1point4 already did an excellent writeup on how to do that – in fact I read and followed that when doing it. http://www.ft86club.com/forums/showthread.php?t=20311

What he didn’t cover, however is the brake pad change, which is actually pretty simple, but I saw that no one had done an article on it yet so I figured I would snap a few pics and do the writeup myself.

Tools needed:
Jack and jackstands or a lift
19mm socket and a breaker bar, or the lug wrench from the tool set in the trunk
Wheel lock key (if you have wheel locks)
14mm socket and ratcheting wrench
Rubber/latex or mechanic’s gloves (optional but recommended)
Torque wrench (optional but recommended)
C-clamp (optional)
Turkey baster (optional for removing excess brake fluid)
10mm or 11mm wrench (optional for bleeding brakes)
spray bottle of water (in case you spill any fluid)
paper towels or rags (for cleaning any spills)
work light or flashlight (optional)
short stool or chair (optional)

Supplies needed:
1 set of replacement brake pads (for the front, set of 4 pads total; another set of 4 for rear)
Anti-squeal brake grease (optional)
Tasty beverage (optional)

Total time required: approximately 30 min to 1 hour. I probably spent 30 min lifting the car and removing/replacing the wheels carefully. About 15 min actually working on the brakes, including stopping and taking pictures. With practice I am sure you can do the whole brake pad swap in even less time.

Instructions:
1. First before you lift the car, loosen the lug nuts on the wheels that you will be removing, using the lug wrench or a 19mm socket and breaker bar. If you are just changing the front pads then you could do one wheel at a time. I was going to be doing a full brake fluid flush and speed bleeders install at the same time so I loosened all 4 wheels.

2. Lift the car using jack and stands, or a lift. If the former, take care to do this safely, follow the very thorough and well written instructions written up by @GrimmSpeed: http://www.ft86club.com/forums/showthread.php?t=10111

Safety first! If you are not sure what you are doing seek help from an experienced friend or take it to a shop instead.

3. Remove the wheel. Put the lug nuts in a safe place where you won’t lose them or trip over them.



4. Now you have access to the brake rotor and caliper. There are two 14mm bolts on the back side of the caliper that hold the caliper to the rotor and thus clamp the brake pads in place. Use your ratchet and socket to loosen the top bolt, and remove the bottom bolt.



5. You do not have to remove the top bolt, as now you can simply swing the caliper up and away from the pads, pivoting on the loosened top bolt. Note that the caliper is still connected to the brake lines and you should take care not to damage the lines. Now the 2 pads (one on each side of the rotor) are exposed and you can simply pull them out and away from the rotor. I held the caliper up with one hand and removed the pads with the other, they came out easily. Take note of their positioning as you will need to put the new pads in the same way. Some clips remained in the rotor/caliper as I removed the pad, they help to align and hold the pads in place. I left those in the caliper; if you have replacement clips with the pads you bought you can remove and replace these. At this time you can also inspect your rotors and see if they are worn, scored, or otherwise showing signs of severe wear. Replacing your rotors or having them refinished may be necessary, but that is beyond the scope of this particular writeup – I was upgrading my pads at 3000 miles to get ready for a track day, so my rotors are fairly new and not in need of replacement.





6. New pads are pictured on the left, old pads are on the right. My OEM pads are practically new so they have plenty of thickness left. I am upgrading my front pads to Carbotech XP8s which are a racing/track pad and will hang on to the OEM pads as a backup. Note that the OEM pads have additional clips and shims attached to them that the XP8s do not have. The clips help you recognize when your pads are worn out and need replacing by scraping against the rotor when the pad material is worn down to the point that the clips make contact with the rotor. The shims are supposed to help reduce brake noise or squeal. If you are replacing your pads with OEM or street-use pads, you will probably want to install the clips and shims on the new pads to retain these functions. You would also apply some anti-squeal brake grease between the shims and the pads. Make sure you do not put any grease on the pad material or the rotor – only on the back side of the pad. At CSG Mike’s advice I am skipping the clips and shims and grease because they are not really needed for race pads and the grease will just smoke and burn off at high track temperatures.

7. Place the new pads back into place and gently lower the caliper. If your old pads were badly worn, you will now notice that the caliper pistons are too far extended to allow you to lower the caliper over the pads. If so follow the next step to depress the pistons. If you are able to lower the caliper all the way then skip the next 2 steps.



8. At this point, remove the cap from the brake master cylinder/reservoir (under the hood). Now you are going to compress both pistons. You can do this one of two ways. If you have a C-clamp you can place the used brake pad against the pistons and then tighten the C-clamp on the caliper and pad to compress the piston. Or, you can use the lug wrench handle across the two pistons, and push on it with both hands. Use a rocking motion from one piston to the other until eventually they are both fully depressed. You can brace the caliper against the strut so that you can get a decent amount of force onto the caliper. While you are doing this, it is important to periodically check the level of the brake fluid in the reservoir. As you push the pistons in it will push brake fluid back into the reservoir. Brake fluid is extremely corrosive and will eat paint -- you don't want it to overflow and splash around in your engine bay. If you do spill any fluid, spray down the area with water immediately and wipe it up with paper towels or rags.

9. If you cannot get the pistons depressed, you will need to release pressure (and fluid) from the system by opening the caliper bleed screw (with a hose attached and appropriate catch bottle ready – you will need a small 10mm wrench). This will allow you to easily depress both pistons, BUT will absolutely necessitate a bleed of the brake system afterward. See f1point4’s article on bleeding the brakes. You may also have to follow this procedure if depressing the pistons causes the reservoir fluid level to get too high, but what I would do is use a turkey baster to suction off the excess fluid and drain it into a spare bottle or can (take care not to drip brake fluid on the paintwork).



10. Now the caliper can be lowered gently over the pads, and you can replace the lower 14mm bolt, and retighten the upper 14mm bolt. Don’t over tighten these bolts. According to the FR-S service manual the torque should be 19 ft-lbs. The space is a little too tight to fit a torque wrench, so I just approximated it by feel.



11. Other possible steps: since you’ve already got the wheel off and you’re there, you can install speed bleeders, stainless steel brake lines, and/or bleed or flush the brake fluid. Again, refer to the previous article by f1point4 for directions on any of these.

12. Now you can put the wheel back on and secure it with the lug nuts. Hand tighten them (in star pattern) and then lower the car/remove the jack stand. Once the wheel is fully loaded on the ground, tighten the lugs to 89 ft-lbs using a torque wrench.

13. Repeat the process described in steps 3-12 for the other side.

14. If you are replacing pads on the rear as well, the steps are basically the same. The only difference is that you only remove the lower 14mm bolt, and I found that the caliper will swing up without needing to loosen the upper bolt, to get to the pads.

15. Very Important!!! Once you’re done installing all the pads, start the car and pump the brake pedal a few times to make sure the pistons/pads are fully primed and ready to go before you drive off.

16. In a safe area, road test the car to make sure the brakes work properly. Follow the bedding procedure as recommended by your brake pad’s instructions. Typically this involves incrementally increasing speeds and applying hard braking pressure until the brakes get nice and hot, then letting them cool off. Make sure you do this in a safe area, i.e. not on city streets filled with traffic.

Thanks and credits to f1point4 for his previous write up which guided me, and to GrimmSpeed for their lifting and jackstands tutorial. Shout out to @CounterSpace Garage who supplied me with the Carbotech brake pads, and Motul brake fluid, and answered many of my questions about brakes and pad selection. Also parts of this write up were inspired and guided by a DIY posted on ClubWRX by user pace, who documented the pad change process on a WRX. http://www.clubwrx.net/forums/mainte...-pads-wrx.html

If you spot any inaccuracies or have anything to add, please let me know!
__________________

Last edited by PMok; 03-20-2014 at 01:35 AM. Reason: added a few small details
PMok is offline   Reply With Quote
The Following 61 Users Say Thank You to PMok For This Useful Post:
1Cor10:23 (05-19-2015), amram (03-21-2014), Anthonytpt (04-18-2013), Asurendra (11-16-2013), bcj (11-23-2015), BigFatFlip (12-26-2012), BRAWL (03-22-2014), chenshuo (05-09-2013), chrisp1992 (03-23-2014), CounterSpace Garage (05-28-2013), CxG (05-17-2016), danthedirt (12-28-2012), DarkSunrise (09-17-2013), developer (12-19-2012), DocWalt (10-07-2015), Donbrz (04-13-2015), driftagoon (08-26-2015), eurominican (11-28-2016), F1point4 (12-27-2012), finch1750 (03-01-2014), FRSBRZGT86FAN (09-27-2015), ft86Fan (12-20-2012), GhostOp86 (08-20-2015), Greenhorn (03-21-2014), Guff (12-19-2012), Hanakuso (12-27-2012), hushypushy (04-23-2014), IBill4You (09-15-2016), illicitstylz (07-08-2014), Jesse (12-27-2012), Jetscape (07-22-2013), jimmillion (06-29-2014), kodyo (12-17-2014), MaXimus (12-29-2012), mfbmike (01-24-2014), mike_ekim1024 (12-07-2013), misooscar (03-13-2016), MJones_RB (05-10-2017), mla163 (06-06-2013), MTCRX (04-20-2013), mx5 2nr (05-23-2014), ndsleep612 (02-27-2016), nzer (11-21-2013), Pointmutation (07-17-2016), racecaresuaceb (03-21-2013), Rosticles (04-09-2015), smg1138 (07-12-2016), Strife26 (05-02-2017), tato.valverde (06-05-2015), the new guy (04-19-2014), TofuJoe (09-20-2016), torqdork (08-12-2013), WatchmaN (03-11-2013), wbradley (04-23-2015), whataboutbob (12-28-2012), Yamaha_R6 (03-28-2014), YMAA (07-06-2015), ymboc (12-19-2012), ysu (06-19-2016), ZionsWrath (05-24-2014), zoomzoomers (03-22-2013)
Old 12-19-2012, 03:15 AM   #2
PMok
Codename: Stitch
 
PMok's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Drives: 05 tC; 06 IS350; 16 BRZ
Location: Hayward/NorCal
Posts: 5,091
Thanks: 3,724
Thanked 5,173 Times in 2,214 Posts
Mentioned: 440 Post(s)
Tagged: 6 Thread(s)
Sorry for the loss of the images in this thread, Photobucket has changed their policy about external hosting.
Until I get around to rehosting the images somewhere else, you can access the photos from this DIY by going directly to the Photobucket album:
http://s78.photobucket.com/user/pmok...ru/brake%20job
__________________

Last edited by PMok; 08-21-2017 at 03:39 PM.
PMok is offline   Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to PMok For This Useful Post:
ZionsWrath (05-24-2014)
Old 12-19-2012, 07:30 AM   #3
Guff
Now w/ over 400 womprats!
 
Guff's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Drives: BRZ LZR
Location: Texas/Illinois
Posts: 4,723
Thanks: 10,298
Thanked 3,250 Times in 1,377 Posts
Mentioned: 269 Post(s)
Tagged: 4 Thread(s)
Garage
Excellent DIY! Definitely useful for anybody that's doing pads for the first time!
__________________
"Sweet Subaru, sweet Subaru, send your BRZ unto me, for the roads of the unworthy must be baptized in speed and glory."
- The Ancient BRZ Sacrament
by Zaku
Guff is offline   Reply With Quote
The Following 3 Users Say Thank You to Guff For This Useful Post:
driftartist (12-19-2012), dustmann (05-20-2016), ZionsWrath (05-24-2014)
Old 12-19-2012, 08:46 AM   #4
Jeffsu350
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2012
Drives: Frs
Location: Dc
Posts: 105
Thanks: 9
Thanked 52 Times in 20 Posts
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Nice write up

I want to emphasize step 15 ... The brake pedal will go to the floor several times, if you have compressed the pistons to install the new pads.

You will have no stopping if you just drive off without doing this step.
Jeffsu350 is offline   Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to Jeffsu350 For This Useful Post:
ZionsWrath (05-24-2014)
Old 12-19-2012, 09:13 AM   #5
Grimlock
Senior Member
 
Grimlock's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2011
Drives: BRZ and NA
Location: Annapolis, MD
Posts: 878
Thanks: 46
Thanked 268 Times in 167 Posts
Mentioned: 11 Post(s)
Tagged: 2 Thread(s)
Are you still able to use the C clamp on the rears? Wouldn't the rear pistons need to be 'screwed' in using a tool because of the emergency brakes? Or do Subarus not work that way?
Grimlock is offline   Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to Grimlock For This Useful Post:
ZionsWrath (05-24-2014)
Old 12-19-2012, 02:28 PM   #6
Jeffsu350
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2012
Drives: Frs
Location: Dc
Posts: 105
Thanks: 9
Thanked 52 Times in 20 Posts
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
The parking brake is a drum brake inside the hat of the rear rotors.

So no, the piston does not have to be screwed in
Jeffsu350 is offline   Reply With Quote
The Following 4 Users Say Thank You to Jeffsu350 For This Useful Post:
driftartist (12-19-2012), PMok (12-20-2012), Shanahan (03-28-2013), ZionsWrath (05-24-2014)
Old 12-27-2012, 11:08 PM   #7
Panman
Senior Member
 
Panman's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2012
Drives: 86 GTS
Location: Brisbane Australia
Posts: 706
Thanks: 141
Thanked 270 Times in 175 Posts
Mentioned: 13 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by PMok View Post
14. If you are replacing pads on the rear as well, the steps are basically the same. The only difference (I am told, as I didnít replace mine this time) is that you would remove both 14mm bolts instead of just the one, and pull the caliper off to get to the pads. Make sure you support the caliper in some way so it isnít just dangling off the brake line.

If you spot any inaccuracies or have anything to add, please let me know!
I actually replaced all the pads this weekend, procedure for the rears is almost exactly the same as the front, and only the lower bolt needs to be removed and the caliper swung up the same as the fronts.

All the same cautions apply - pump those brakes up before moving the car!!!!
Panman is offline   Reply With Quote
The Following 3 Users Say Thank You to Panman For This Useful Post:
ATL BRZ (03-08-2013), PMok (12-28-2012), ZionsWrath (05-24-2014)
Old 12-27-2012, 11:14 PM   #8
Dave-ROR
Site Moderator
 
Dave-ROR's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Drives: Stuff
Location: Florida
Posts: 9,230
Thanks: 621
Thanked 4,502 Times in 2,012 Posts
Mentioned: 197 Post(s)
Tagged: 8 Thread(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by Panman View Post
I actually replaced all the pads this weekend, procedure for the rears is almost exactly the same as the front, and only the lower bolt needs to be removed and the caliper swung up the same as the fronts.

All the same cautions apply - pump those brakes up before moving the car!!!!
This is correct.
__________________
-Dave
DD: 2016 Focus RS || Rotting ex-DD: 1995 BMW M3 || Tow Vehicle: 2004 GMC Sierra 2500 8.1L || Weekend toy: 1994 MR2 Turbo || The other weekend toy: 1993 MR2 Turbo || Track car: 1998 Integra Type-R || Race car: 1996 Integra GS-R || And another 2000 Integra GS-R

Too many cars.. never.
Dave-ROR is offline   Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to Dave-ROR For This Useful Post:
ZionsWrath (05-24-2014)
Old 12-28-2012, 11:57 PM   #9
Kamran
Pepe Le Pew Wannabe
 
Kamran's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2012
Drives: FR-S
Location: WA
Posts: 137
Thanks: 10
Thanked 21 Times in 17 Posts
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Great detailed write up. Thanks for the effort. The only thing I d add is if you have a way of pumping the brakes before step 10, I.e. put the bolt back in, finger tight, then pump the brakes and hold the brake pedal down while someone else torqued/tightens the caliper mounting bolts, you will have your caliper perfectly aligned on the center line of your rotor.
Kamran is offline   Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to Kamran For This Useful Post:
ZionsWrath (05-24-2014)
Old 03-22-2013, 07:24 PM   #10
Red Barchetta
Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2012
Drives: DGM BRZ
Location: Northern Suburb
Posts: 22
Thanks: 6
Thanked 3 Times in 3 Posts
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Thanks for writing up this DYI. Worked perfectly to change the front pads on my BRZ. I have a question regarding the metal shim on the original pads. I did not transfer those to my new Ferodo pads. Any problems not transferring those? Thanks in advance for the reply.
Red Barchetta is offline   Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to Red Barchetta For This Useful Post:
ZionsWrath (05-24-2014)
Old 03-22-2013, 08:27 PM   #11
PMok
Codename: Stitch
 
PMok's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Drives: 05 tC; 06 IS350; 16 BRZ
Location: Hayward/NorCal
Posts: 5,091
Thanks: 3,724
Thanked 5,173 Times in 2,214 Posts
Mentioned: 440 Post(s)
Tagged: 6 Thread(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by Red Barchetta View Post
Thanks for writing up this DYI. Worked perfectly to change the front pads on my BRZ. I have a question regarding the metal shim on the original pads. I did not transfer those to my new Ferodo pads. Any problems not transferring those? Thanks in advance for the reply.
from my original post:
Quote:
The shims are supposed to help reduce brake noise or squeal. If you are replacing your pads with OEM or street-use pads, you will probably want to install the clips and shims on the new pads to retain these functions. You would also apply some anti-squeal brake grease between the shims and the pads. Make sure you do not put any grease on the pad material or the rotor Ė only on the back side of the pad. At CSG Mikeís advice I am skipping the clips and shims and grease because they are not really needed for race pads and the grease will just smoke and burn off at high track temperatures.
I think the only effect of not having the shims on is you may have more brake squeal/noise.
__________________
PMok is offline   Reply With Quote
The Following 3 Users Say Thank You to PMok For This Useful Post:
DM7 (09-06-2017), Red Barchetta (03-22-2013), ZionsWrath (05-24-2014)
Old 03-22-2013, 08:59 PM   #12
Red Barchetta
Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2012
Drives: DGM BRZ
Location: Northern Suburb
Posts: 22
Thanks: 6
Thanked 3 Times in 3 Posts
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Thanks for the response. Great write up.
Red Barchetta is offline   Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to Red Barchetta For This Useful Post:
ZionsWrath (05-24-2014)
Old 03-22-2013, 09:01 PM   #13
SloS13
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2013
Drives: 2013 FR-S whiteout
Location: Columbia, SC
Posts: 157
Thanks: 65
Thanked 165 Times in 59 Posts
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
don't forget to grease the slide pins (with proper grease)
SloS13 is offline   Reply With Quote
The Following 4 Users Say Thank You to SloS13 For This Useful Post:
amram (03-27-2014), Muaddib (08-03-2014), PMok (03-22-2013), ZionsWrath (05-24-2014)
Old 03-01-2014, 01:01 AM   #14
Ayrton
Member
 
Ayrton's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2013
Drives: 86 HS AFE filter, BRZ Xors, Kaymak
Location: Durban
Posts: 29
Thanks: 39
Thanked 10 Times in 4 Posts
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Excellent. Thanks a lot for this article.
Ayrton is offline   Reply With Quote
The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to Ayrton For This Useful Post:
PMok (03-20-2014), ZionsWrath (05-24-2014)
 
Reply

Tags
brake pads, pad change

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Brake Pads, Rotors and All Your Brake/Suspension Needs! Great Prices!! Check it out!! Mike@CZP Brakes, Suspension, Chassis 339 09-08-2017 06:03 PM
which brake pads? NESW20 Suspension | Chassis | Brakes 164 08-25-2017 04:40 PM
Redline360: Brake Lines, Brake Rotors, Brake Pads for BRZ/FRS Redline360 Brakes, Suspension, Chassis 12 01-05-2013 11:20 PM
brake pads Dpark27 Suspension | Chassis | Brakes 3 09-07-2012 07:58 PM


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 01:43 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Garage vBulletin Plugins by Drive Thru Online, Inc.