Via 7tune:

According to Japan’s “Best Car magazine”, the FT86’s release date is set to be postponed a further 2 years with the goal posts being shifted from a 2011 release date to 2013.

Toyota are offering two reasons for this reported delay. It is said that the design is going to be amended yet again, indicating a fresh source of frustration for fans of the car the world over. Toyota appear to have gone to lengths to reiterate that the concept we have all seen at the 2010 TMS was only that; a prototype and they have left the door open for further changes to its shape.

Best Car has also said that according to the data from the newly formed TMJ group (Toyota Marketing Japan), fears exist that the release date for 2011 may be premature – with a global economic slowdown effecting sales and with expectations that the sports car market is going to take longer to recover.

With the car slated to be displayed again at the Tokyo Motor Show in 2011, Toyota are also said to be taking a hard look at the success of Honda’s CR-Z, with its hybrid engine the main focus and this may end up influencing the development of the FT-86.

Interestingly, Toyota is said to be planning to sell the car in Japan for a little over 2,000,000 yen – quite cheap in itself but it is too early to say for certain.

Indeed many things about the development of this car are uncertain and this cannot be helping the confidence of the legions of people hungry to get their hands on this car when it does in fact go on sale officially.

As it stands, this latest round of reported changes lend lend themselves to the impression that Toyota appear to be doing their best to score an own goal with this car.

Source: Best Car Japan via 7tune

Saturday May 8, 2010 11:56

According to R&T, Toyota is currently working on a “baby FT-86″ sports coupe to slot in under the Toyota FT-86. The baby FT-86 is expected to be priced at $5000 less than the FT-86, which makes some sense since it’s been recently reported that the FT-86 will come to market at a price tag slightly higher than Toyota’s original $20,000 target.

Hence, the baby FT-86 sports car will fill Toyota’s sub-$20k sports car slot. The rumor is that the car will measure 150 inches overall length and be powered by Toyota’s 1.5L inline 4-cylinder 3SZ-VE engine, good for 109bhp. The drivetrain will feature a front engine and rear wheel drive. Rumored debut date is 2012.

Discussions on the baby Toyota FT-86 HERE.

Wednesday April 28, 2010 21:53

The original Toyota FT-86 concept is being shown by Toyota at the 2010 Beijing Auto Show currently underway in China. Although the FT-86 has not yet been shown at any North American auto shows, this move by Toyota goes to show the increased importance placed on the Chinese market by the world’s car manufacturers.

Not much new is shown since this appears to be the same original concept car first debuted at the past Tokyo Motor Show. The only new element seen is the trunk being opened during prep for the show, which is likely a fuel cell (placed there just for concept use purposes). The open trunk also shows that the FT-86 does not feature a hatch (as some speculated) but a standard trunk.

[SEE FULL PHOTO SET HERE]

Autocar is now reporting that the Toyota FT-86 pricing will be higher than originally planned. The FT-86 price will be upped in Japan from the original $20,000 starting price to $23,000 (with a fully loaded FT-86 being approximately $26,000). The FT-86 development team is also planning on reducing fuel consumption from the Subaru boxer engine (instead of increasing power).

Finally, in terms of target demographic, Toyota has now upped the increased target buyer age from 30′s to the 40′s. This is due to Toyota market research which indicated that not as many young buyers would purchase the FT-86 coupe as the company originally predicted. Discuss this report HERE.

The Toyota FT-86 is on the list of “25 Cars Worth Waiting For” in years 2011-2014 says Car and Driver Magazine in their May 2010 issue (tell us something we don’t know! ;))

The article doesn’t provide any information that we haven’t already discussed on our forums, but C&D predicts that the car may revive the Celica nameplate for the production version of the FT-86. The author also recognizes that although a rumored 170hp 2.0L engine may sound underpowered, it may still provide plenty of thrills if paired with a lightweight nimble and dynamic chassis (using the 167hp Mazda Miata as a good example). And if 170hp isn’t adequate, C&D predicts a 230hp turbo version will follow. Finallly, they peg the price point at just above $20,000 USD.

See the cover and article INSIDE.

As I posted here, I have been attending the 2010 New York Auto Show press days, where unfortunately, the Toyota FT-86 is not present. An appearance of the FT-86 at the 2010 NYIAS would have marked the first time that the highly anticipated Toyota sports coupe concept car be shown to a North American audience. When we asked, the Toyota personnel at the NYIAS also did not know when the FT-86 concept will first appear at a U.S. autoshow. But, stay tuned… the moment we find out, we will be sure to let you all know!

Last we reported, the FT-86 G-sport Concept’s was being displayed at the Toyota Amlux display building in Tokyo. It appears that this FT-86 concept car has now been moved to another location within Tokyo – the Tokyo Mega Web, a look and ride car theme park which features all of Toyota’s offerings. The original red FT-86 concept was previously at this location, so perhaps the two concept FT-86 cars have exchanged locations.

Check INSIDE for more photos and a video.

Richard Hammond, one of the longtime hosts of the ever popular Top Gear program on BBC wrote about the FT-86 in his column today (full article HERE). The “Hamster” predicts that the Toyota FT-86 will be a massive success due to its RWD architecture, fantastic looks, and affordable price.

It seems that the FT-86 has certainly caught the interest of Hammond, as this is the second time he has written about the car in his Top Gear column. See his first column HERE.

Click here for Richard Hammond’s March 17, 2010 FT-86 article.